Nanoimprint and Nanoprint Processes for Making MoS2 Transistor Arrays and Biosensors

Time 2015-11-12 11:30~12:00 Place Room 603+604
Code No. FB-I05 Session Chair
Name Prof. Xiaogan Liang
Affiliation University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Title Nanoimprint and Nanoprint Processes for Making MoS2 Transistor Arrays and Biosensors
Co-author-1PrefixProf.
CountryUnited State of America
First name
Last name
Affiliation
Department
E-mail
Cell phone
Co-author-2PrefixMr.
CountryUnited State of America
First name
Last name
Affiliation
Department
E-mail
Cell phone
Co-author-3PrefixMr.
CountryUnited State of America
First name
Last name
Affiliation
Department
E-mail
Cell phone
Co-author-4PrefixMr.
CountryMr.
First name
Last name
Affiliation
Department
E-mail
Cell phone
Contents
Emerging layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have attractive electronic/ /photonic/structural properties, versatile chemistry, and large natural abundance. As one of the most popular TMDCs, MoS2 has emerged as a very promising nanoelectronic material candidate for new device applications, such as ultrasensitive biosensors, multi-bit memories, and flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices with high quantum efficiencies. Although a great deal of recent research effort concentrates on the attractive characteristics associated with monolayer MoS2 structures, many important electronic/photonic applications, such as transistor-based memories/sensors, photovoltaics, and power TFTs, indeed demand high-quality few-layer/multilayer MoS2 structures with controllable thickness as well as consistent device performance. However, there are so far very few research efforts dedicated to produce high-quality multilayer MoS2 device structures with a high uniformity of thicknesses as well as electronic/photonic properties over large areas. Toward ultimately realizing upscalable production of highly uniform multilayer MoS2 device arrays or large-scale circuits, we developed new nanoimprint/nanoprint-based nanofabrication approaches capable of producing pristine multilayer MoS2 fake arrays with high uniformity of flake thicknesses (i.e., relative thickness error ~ 12%) over cm2-scale areas, and also demonstrated multiple working transistors and electronic biosensors made from as-produced MoS2 flakes, which exhibited very consistent performance (e.g., relative errors of important transistor performance parameters, such as mobility values, ON/OFF currents, subthreshold swings, and threshold voltages < 25%). Our work provides new nanofabrication routes for generating pristine TMDC device arrays with well controlled properties, which holds significant potential to be further developed into a continuous high-throughput nanomanufacturing system capable of producing commercially viable electronic products based on emerging layered materials.